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Nehi Beverages bottle
  1. Details
  2. Images
  3. Conditions
  4. Events
  5. Provenance
  6. Notes

Details

Object ID 003500

Object Name Nehi Beverages bottle

Object Desc Clear glass soda bottle with yellow and red painted logo

Collection General Collection

Accession # CMY003136

Alternate ID

General Category History

Category Soft Drinks

Source

Source Category Found In Collection

Accession Date JAN 1,1991

Credit/Acknowledgement

Location Room 4, Closet, Shelf 1

Object Date

Start Year Range

End Year Range

Status On-Site Collection Storage

Object Keywords soft drink,glassware,Nehi,beverages,


Title Nehi Beverages bottle

Description Clear glass 10 oz. soda bottle with diagonal beveling, yellow and red logo paint on front, back printing: Manhattan Royal Crown Corp. Chicago, Ill, filled with clear liquid, gold cap, bottom embossed: Duraglas

Collector

Approx Collection Date

Height 10

Length 0

Width 0

Depth 0

Diameter 2.5

Circumference 0

Weight 10

Unit of Measure Inches/ounces

Dimension Details

Quantity 1

Material

Site

Site Details

Place of Origin

Maker Nehi Manhattan Royal Crown Corp. Chicago, Ill

Maker Details No info on botteler found; here is a site with RC history: http://s1.zetaboards.com/ACLS/topic/2727230/1/ Duraglas: This was the proprietary name for a process used by the Owens-Illinois Glass Company where the surface of the hot, just produced bottles, were sprayed on the body, shoulder, and neck (not base or the top of the finish) with a stannic chloride vapor that allowed the tin to bond to the outer surface and providing scratch resistance and durability to the bottles. (Information courtesy of Phil Perry, engineer with that company.) This process - and the embossed notation of it ( in script) on the base of many Owens-Illinois products - began in 1940 and continued up until at least the mid-1950s, though the process is still in use today without the notation (Toulouse 1971; Miller & Morin 2004; Phil Perry, O-I engineer pers. comm. 2007). The photo to the right (click to enlarge) is of a 1941 beer bottle with the Duraglas notation in the lower portion of the base em

Maker Mark

Images

(click for full image)

Image Caption CMY3136

Description

Conditions

Date AUG 6,2015

Summary Good

Assessor Megan Hindman

Notes


Events

Date AUG 6,2015

Summary Location change

Notes Location changed to Room 4, Closet, Shelf 1 from Hallway Shelf 3 - automatic entry by admin


Provenance

Notes