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Judge Magazine Trusts illustration
  1. Details
  2. Images
  3. Conditions
  4. Events
  5. Provenance
  6. Notes

Details

Object ID 002410

Object Name Judge Magazine Trusts illustration

Object Desc Color lithograph for Judge magazine titled "Natural Laws Governing Trusts". Illustration depicts John Arbuckle and H. O. Havemeyer throwing coffee boxes at each other. Represents the Great Coffee-Sugar War.

Collection General Collection

Accession # CMY002138

Alternate ID

General Category Printed Material

Category Periodicals

Source

Source Category Found In Collection

Accession Date JAN 1,1991

Credit/Acknowledgement

Location Room 7, Shelf 7

Object Date 1900

Start Year Range

End Year Range

Status On-Site Collection Storage

Object Keywords illustrations,Judge magazine,periodicals,magazines,lithographs,politics,Sackett & Wilhelm Litho & Ptg,Arbuckle's Coffee,Republican Party,Lion Brand Coffee,coffee,Arbuckle, John,Havemeyer, H. O.,American Sugar Refining Co.,Great Coffee-Sugar War,


Title Judge Magazine Trusts illustration

Sub-Title Natural Laws Governing Trusts

Series

Edition

Description / Abstract Illustration depicts the Great Coffee-Sugar War between Arbuckle and Havemeyer, represented by the men throwing coffee at each other. The result was cheaper prices for coffee, which is why the crowds of people are smiling and catching the thrown coffee.

Physical Description One page color illustration from Judge magazine. Encased in plastic with cardboard backing and red tape around edges. Illustration deptics John Arbuckle and H. O. Havemeyer standing on barrels throwing coffee at each other. There is a crowd of smiling people catching coffee in bins. At bottom center there is a table with prices of coffee before and after the fight. At lower left edge is text "Copyright 1900 by Judge Company of New York." At bottom center is text "Natural Laws Governing Trusts". At lower right edge is text "Sackett & Wilhelms Litho. & Ptg. Co. New York" Dims: 10 1/2" H x 13 1/2" W

Author

Author Details

LCCN

ISBN

ISSN

Language

Publisher Judge Company

Publisher Details

Spine / Label

Images

(click for full image)

Image Caption CMY2138

Description

Conditions

Date JUN 5,2014

Summary good

Assessor BN

Notes Overall, good condition. Enclosure is not archival or original and should be addressed. Light wear on edges. At right edge lower part the plastic is torn and the paper edge is exposed. Edges are discolored and yellowed. Some creases around edges. Tearing in paper at top edge, most likely from being torn from magazine. Small tears along left edge. Plastic is worn and scratched.


Events

Date JUN 5,2014

Summary Status change

Notes Status changed to On-Site Collection Storage from On Exhibit - automatic entry by admin


Date JUN 5,2014

Summary Location change

Notes Location changed to Room 7 from Room 1, Shelf 16 - automatic entry by admin


Date JUN 6,2014

Summary Location change

Notes Location changed to Room 7, Shelf 7 from Room 7 - automatic entry by admin


Provenance

Notes

Date JUN 5,2014

Notes The illustration depicts John Arbuckle and H. O. Havemeyer fighting, representing the Great Coffee-Sugar War (1898-1901). Arbuckle used sugar ordered from Havemeyer's American Sugar Refining Company for his coffee glaze. Havemeyer was head of the sugar trust, and Arbuckle was in charge of the coffee trust. Havemeyer was a predatory businessman and drove other sugar companies out of business. Arbuckle then decided to diversify from coffee to sugar. Havemeyer was fine with Arbuckle selling sugar as long as he bought it from his refinery, but Arbuckle decided to open his own refinery. Havemyer then decided to purchase the Lion brand cofee owned by Woolsen Spice Company in Ohio. The result was overproduction and prices slid. Each man tried to slash prices and undercut the other. There were a serious of lawsuits and also slandering of each other's products. While no formal agreement was reached for a cease-fire, in 1903, Havemeyer gave up trying to put Arbuckle out of business. This Judge illustration has a table at bottom center that notes the price changes due to this fight. http://books.google.com/books?id=TUo981rkwkoC&pg=PA67&lpg=PA67&dq=lion+brand+coffee+havemeyer&source=bl&ots=Be2rvfZUDP&sig=w5JB4UykFayUi9ujiJHL8AbZYy0&hl=en&sa=X&ei=8nWQU8G9KIyI8gGoyIHIBg&ved=0CDoQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=lion%20brand%20coffee%20havemeyer&f=false