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Since our Bootlegger’s Bash is coming up on August 20th, I thought I’d make a post for the gentlemen looking for some style advice on what to wear.

In the 1920s, bowties were starting to fall out of fashion for everyday wear. Although they were still the standard for formal evening wear.

For the most part, during the day men mostly wore neckties. In 1926, a designer from New York named Jesse Langsdorf designed the tie that was formed from three separate pieces sewn together. This allowed the tie to retain its shape when it was tied, and was so successful that this shape is still used today.

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One type of tie that was popular in the 1920s was the Macclesfield Tie, which had small geometric patterns on it. 

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Other ties had stripes in contrasting colors. It was especially common for men in clubs to wear ties with the colors of their club.

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During the 1930s wealthier men began wearing silk ties with art deco patterns on them. In general, most ties in the 1930s began having brighter colors and patterns than the ones that were worn in the 1920s, following the trend of the era.

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And even if you couldn’t afford the fancy silk ties, there was always an option. Many working class men wore knitted ties made out of simple wool or cotton yarn, and they would try to emulate the fancier patterns or stripes in their knitting.

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Also, gentlemen, it is important to note that men in the 1920s and the 1930s wore their ties very short compared to modern standards. Typically it would have been proper to wear a vest or keep your coat buttoned over your tie, but the ends of the tie would barely reach the top of your pants.

Well, gentlemen, I hope this gives you a better idea on what tie you should wear to our Bootlegger’s Bash Event! 


By Kayla Sutherland
Associate, Chudnow Museum of Yesteryear
 
 
Ladies, are you planning on coming to our flapper party and want to look the part? Or do you just feel like getting dressed up in that totally in-style “Great Gatsby-esque” look? Well, here’s some ideas on how to get your makeup on point!

First of all, you’ll need to start with your base, and powder your face.

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After the natural Gibson Girl look of the early 1900s and 1910s, the 1920s offered women a chance to embrace makeup, and they went for a more “unnatural” look. Ladies would use powders and creams to give themselves pale skin and then apply rouge for nice bright cheeks.

Next, if you’ve looked at any photographs or advertisements from the 1920s I’m sure you’ve noticed that the eyes were one of the main focuses for ladies’ makeup.

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Eyebrows were long and thin, and eyes were surrounded with thick eyeliner and heavy dark lashes, and dynamic eyeshadows in bright or dark colors. So try out some colorful smoky eyes! Maybelline was a huge brand at this time, with the first commercially sold mascara, an alternative to brushing on coal and vaseline!

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Another focus for your makeup should be your lips. Bright red lips were (and still are!) all the rage! So rock out that red lipstick, ladies! Don’t shy away from color and drama, that’s what the 1920s were all about!

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If you think the colors might be a bit bright, just switch your filter over to grayscale and rock out some vintage selfies!

Channel these dynamic ladies, Clara Bow and Louise Brooks, and remember these words of wisdom:
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By Kayla Sutherland
Associate, Chudnow Museum of Yesteryear
 

Era of Bootlegging

04/18/2013

 
PicturePabst Brewery in 1935 at the end of national Prohibition
For 14 years prohibition lasted in this country during which time the production, distribution, or sale of alcohol was illegal. The 18th Amendment that brought about prohibition is the only federal amendment ever repealed. Cities like Milwaukee built profitable industries around alcohol production and employed thousands of workers. 

Attempting to make illegal what had always been legal mostly just drove the market underground. Bootleggers took advantage of this opportunity and supplied illegal bars nicknamed speakeasies because a patron had to "speak easy" with a password to gain admission.

The video below is of a notorious bootlegger in the North West who acted against the amendment he did not believe was right. There were many people supportive of his actions against prohibition.

Similar cases arose throughout the country. Major brewing cities such as Milwaukee, Cincinnati and St. Louis witnessed their industries devastated by prohibition acts. Yet alcohol continued to flow.  Milwaukee was notorious for its speakeasies.  Milwaukee Mayor Daniel Hoan once quipped, "The whole United States Army could not dry up Milwaukee". At one point New York figured to have around 100,000 speakeasies. The law did little to deter people from getting a drink. (Legends of America)

We want to celebrate the rich history of this time at our Bootlegger’s Bash on May 16th. There will be a traditional “speakeasy,” complete with hidden door and password! We will also be dressed for the time, and serve time period specific appetizers. Come check it out! Chudnow Events

By Dustin Hochmuth,
Museum Intern, UW-Whitewater Communications Major

 
 
Our members, followers, and fans have shown growing interest in the events that we hold here at Chudnow Museum. There is a consistent promotion of our events in our theatre that bring discussion of history such as prohibition times, equal rights movements, and the Milwaukee area during the Great Depression. Touring the museum will elaborate upon the interests in these time periods.

Throughout the Museum there are some maps of the time period that display where the relative location of everything would have been “in those days.” During the Talks, the professors and speakers of Milwaukee’s history take the audience back to what life was like in the early 20th century.
A most interesting presentation regarding equal rights is coming up is presented by Dr. Michael Jacobs, history professor from UW Baraboo/ Sauk County. His discussion on April 18 at 6 pm will be on the rise and fall of the KKK in Milwaukee county in the 1920s. The KKK attempted to gain support and followers with events and rallies including a parade down the street in Milwaukee which caused furious crowds. Dr. Jacobs will take the audience through the journey of exploring this history that took place right here in our neighborhoods 90 years ago. 
Following this discussion on April 29th there will be another breathtaking presentation as Amy Shapiro, professor of philosophy and humanities at Alverno College, presents her new book, Different Horror, Same Hell. The collection of essays draws attention to the significance of women's roles and family structures during and in the aftermath of the Holocaust.
If these don’t appeal never forget that we often have movie nights scheduled showing the most popular movies of the time including the Shirley Temple movies. Their popularity made movie making the industry it became to be, and these movies still make for a fun family event to plan on!

We will keep everyone updated on new events we schedule! Hope to see everyone around soon.


By Dustin Hochmuth,
Museum Intern, UW-Whitewater Communications Major